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Jim Prentice ELECTRIC BASEBALL Big League Electric Baseball, Dual Control Electric Baseball, Motor Action Baseball, Super De Luxe Electric Baseball, and others by Jim Prentice and The Electric Game Company -- text copyright 2011, 2017 by the Baseball Games front office staff --
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  An application for a U.S. patent was filed 
  in December 1927 by James M. Prentice 
  of Holyoke, Massachusetts.  Prentice 
  was 17 years old. 
       The patent, for "Electric Baseball," 
  was granted less than a year later, and 
  Jim Prentice Electric Baseball, under 
  a variety of titles and in a variety of forms, 
  would go on to a production run of more 
  than thirty years. 
Despite the enduring popularity of the fondly-remembered Prentice games, their more than thirty variations and their chronology are poorly documented, and Prentice himself (1910-2005) seems a mysterious figure to most, little known beyond his name. We're attempting to correct just a little of that in this photo- essay, sorting through the variations of the games with the corroborating evidence of period advertisements, with our own guesswork based on similarities in box and gameboard graphics, and on newspaper articles, the search for which had us pestering librarians from Buffalo to Boston. Additional information and corrections are welcomed.
Electric Base Ball Game - Parker Brothers, 1930s
Prentice initially sold, or at least licensed, the rights to his invention to Parker Brothers, the game-publishing giant of nearby Salem -- probably to help fund his college tuition at the University of New Hampshire, whence he graduated with a degree in mathematics. Parkers produced Electric Base Ball Game, shown here, arguably the first electrical boardgame ever, in the very early 1930s.

  Some collectors or vendors assume "Jim Prentice Electric Baseball" 
  is a "player-endorsed" game, that Prentice was a pro ballplayer.  
  Far from it.  In a March 2000 article about Prentice in the Springfield 
  Union-News, Prentice's lifelong friend Harry Craven recalled their 
  boyhood.  "When I was playing baseball, Jimmy was working on his 
  games."  
        Prentice returned to Holyoke after college, but his education 
  got him only a 14-dollar-a-week job as an office boy.  But with the 
  enormous aid of his uncle Arthur Dougherty -- $3,000. in start-up 
  money, in the depths of the Great Depression -- the ever-enterprising 
  young Prentice regained control of his patent by the mid-1930s and 
  set himself up in business as The Electric Game Company.  
        Prentice is seen at right in a photo from around 1995. 
Jim Prentice, circa 1995

Electric Base Ball 'Electric Bat' - Electric Game Co, 1930s

One of the first products of The Electric Game Company -- perhaps the very first, and among the simplest of all Prentice baseball games -- was Electric Base Ball "version D02," seen here, featuring the "Electric Bat." Prentice evidently got rights to Parker Brothers' graphics as well. He told the Union-News that in his first year of production, he sold about a hundred games at five dollars each.
Electric Base Ball 'Electric Bat' - Electric Game Co, 1930s

Very similar to both the D02 and the Parker Brothers game, another of the earliest varieties of Electric Base Ball was this, "version DD24," also featuring the "Electric Bat." The "D" and "DD" clearly denoted editions using a single D battery and two D batteries -- perhaps the last obvious indicia in a long list of cryptic Prentice codes. The games were personally assembled by Prentice and a few assistants. "They all got 35 cents an hour," said Prentice, "including me."

Electric Baseball 'red box version 1' - 1930s
  Prentice saved a little money by providing box lids but no box bottoms 
  for his games, leaving many vendors of second-hand games today to 
  think that one part's missing.  It's not.  Lid, no bottom, that's it.  
        Adding to some latter-day confusion, Electric Game Co. box lids 
  and gameboards do not always match up.  Prentice was not one to 
  waste a nickel, so it's very likely that, even while new gameboard 
  models were being designed, produced, and sold, old box-lid inventory 
  was being used until it was exhausted, and only at that point would 
  new and redesigned box lids be printed.  
        The lid most often associated with the earliest 1930s versions of 
  Electric Base Ball is at left.  Two words on the gameboard, "Baseball"   
  is one word here on the box.  The source of the illustration -- the same 
  batter seen on several other box variations (below) -- remains unknown. 

Wonder Baseball Game - Electric Game Co, c1938

Another early-looking version of Prentice electric baseball is Wonder Baseball Game -- a pretty rare number we encountered for the first time only in the spring of 2011 and is now shoehorned here into this article. The illustrated batter would keep on swinging in later variations of the box lid (below).
Wonder Baseball Game - Electric Game Co, c1938

Not only is Wonder again similar to the early models shown above, the promo literature included in the box (and seen here) trumpets both the Wonder game and Electric Base Ball Model D02, as well as Electric Football, and identifies all as available in 1938. Oddly, the Wonder gameboard indicates "patent pending," despite the 1928 patent used on much later models.

Wonder Baseball Game non-electric version - Electric Game Co, c1940s
January 2014 yielded a still newer discovery in Electric Baseball research -- the Wonder Baseball variation shown above. Packaged in a slip-cover sort of box and apparently devoid of battery compartments, control buttons, and lights, this seems to be some kind of non-electric model, perhaps suggesting it's a wartime revision.

  And then suddenly, variations of this 
  long-forgotten game, or at least of its 
  packaging, start popping up left and right.  
  This specialized "Wonder" version of the 
  well-known red box appeared to us for the 
  first time in the spring of 2014.   

      The promotional paperwork mentioned 
  above establishes 1938 as the origin point 
  for Wonder Baseball Game, but later 
  advertising shows the game was still being 
  produced and marketed through at least 
  1948.  
Wonder Baseball Game box, circa 1930s

Big League Electric Baseball 'red box version 2' - 1930s
Slightly later editions of the lid added the phrase "Big League" above "Electric Baseball" -- all in a new font -- and are in fact usually seen covering Big League Electric Baseball Model B-4, at right, which was produced from about 1938 through 1941. Prentice's All-American Electric Football and Collegiate Electric Basketball also debuted by 1938.
Big League Electric Baseball - 1938-41
Like the earliest versions, the B-4 measures about 16x14" -- the standard dimensions of all Prentice Electric Baseball games until the Super De Luxe editions of the early 1950s.

Electric Game Co 1939 ad
Big League Electric Baseball - 1938-41
The 1939 advertisement at left shows all three of the sports games cited just above -- and for those of you hankering for a closer look at the young entrepeneur, well, er, um, this pixellated blow-up is the best we can do...

Jim Prentice Electric Baseball 'red box version 3' - circa 1940
A fourth edition of the red box replaces "Big League" with "Jim Prentice." Likewise the gameboard at right, a subtle and very scarce variation of the previous game. Jim Prentice Electric Baseball, probably from about 1940, sports a version of the cover illustration on the gameboard itself.
Jim Prentice Electric Baseball 'illo board' - circa 1940
The illo occupies space previously used for metal score/count indicators, suggesting that this might be a wartime edition when metal was more urgently needed for the Allied effort.

Jim Prentice Electric Baseball 'red box version 4' - circa 1940
The legend added to this fifth red box variation reads "This Game Operates Electrically Or Mechanically." In fact, Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Dual Control Model, at right, is a little lighter on the bulbs and wiring and the need for batteries, the first hint that this too is not just post-1940 but a wartime product.
Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Dual Control Model - 1940s
Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Dual Control Model, "three knob" version with batter illo

Jim Prentice Electric Baseball - 1940s
Above, a slightly simpler version of Dual Control Model (two knobs, no illo). Almost all models of Electric Baseball carry either the 1928 patent number or are marked "Patent Pending" or "Patent Applied For." The Dual Control models are exceptions -- confirming not only their 1942 invention, but also that they were not a Prentice design. George Alderman and Herbert Fredrick were in fact the fellows granted the patent on this gameboard.
Prolectric Baseball - Mastercraft, 1951
We don't know if it was Prentice, or Alderman and Fredrick, who had control of the patent, but in any case, it was later licensed to a company called Mastercraft, which produced the game as Prolectric Baseball in 1951. Mastercraft also turned out Prolectric Football and possibly other games in the '50s.

Jim Prentice Electric Baseball - 1940s
Here, two more 1940s variations of Jim Prentice Electric Baseball -- Model E120, above, and a scarce early version of the famous Model 48-B at right, both date to 1947, as suggested by period advertising. Prentice had begun running advertisements in comic books, and it was during this immediate post-War era that the games attained their greatest popularity. "The comics really pulled well," Prentice noted in that Union-News article. As his company prospered, Prentice expanded his manufacturing staff and added what would become a nationwide team of sales reps, while Prentice himself became something of a mover and shaker on the Holyoke business and social scene.
Jim Prentice Electric Baseball - Model 48-B, 1947 variation
With substantial changes to its graphics, but oddly not to its alphanumeric designation, the 48-B (above and below) would become the best-known version of Jim Prentice Baseball.

Electric Baseball by Jim Prentice - box, Models E120, 68-B, 48-B, 63-B - 1940s
Above, the famous "alligator-finish" white box, the somewhat antique look of which leads many to assume that the associated games are early 1930s vintage. The cartoon of the swinging batter is in fact based on an early-'30s painting by noted illustrator J. F. Kernan -- the image used in this website's logo -- but this box lid is almost always seen with Models E120, 68-B, 48-B, and 63-B, all verifiably from the late 1940s.
 Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Model 68-B - 1940s
Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Model 68-B -- a subtle variation on the hugely popular 48-B (below). Both were a departure from previous Prentice designs, not only in their livelier, more colorful graphics, but in that both were more "action games" than the earlier electrical battles of wits.

Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Model 48-B - 1940s
Instantly recognizable to game collectors is Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Model 48-B -- easily the most popular and successful number in the Electric Game Company line, if its availability today on the second-hand market is any indication. Time the steel ball running down the channel -- hit a home run! The "48" designation is often assumed to signify a 1948 date of production -- and this is from about that time -- but it's surely only coincidence. A late 1949 ad does show the 48-B as "New for 1950!," which is more likely the case, although then again, art in Electric Game Co ads often depicts previous, alternate, or phantom models.
Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Model 63-B - 1940s
The promo insert in the 1930s Wonder game and the 1949 ad for the De Luxe games both show models not (yet) known to exist -- so advertisements, even with a specific date, aren't always reliable indicators of year-of-production. While some ads can pin down some models to a specific year, putting a date to many others is a matter of guesswork based on typography, graphics, and the associated box lids. Model 63-B, shown here, seems to be a transitional effort between the 48-B and 68-B of the late '40s and the 42-B and 73-B of the early '50s. It also sports an early version, seen at lower right, of the logo that would reappear from about 1949 on.

Electro-Vision Baseball - Tracies, 1949
  The curiosity at left, sporting both 1947 and 1949 
  copyrights, is Electro-Vision Baseball, made by 
  Tracies, Inc.  Tracies, Inc., of Holyoke.  Holyoke, 
  home of Prentice and The Electric Game Company.  
  The modest electrical element involved in its gameplay   
  is quite different and much simpler than that of any 
  Prentice game, but it does use the exact same cover 
  image of the swinging batter as that on the Electric 
  Game Company white-box editions of those same 
  years.  Just what the arrangement was with Prentice, 
  we can only guess, but this was not a one-off -- 
  Tracies also produced Electro-Vision Football 
  and several other games.  

Super De Luxe Electric Baseball - advert, 1949

With the Electric Game Company at its peak, Prentice introduced a more upscale series of games -- larger, more elaborate, more expensive. The 1949 advert here describes two editions of Super De Luxe Electric Baseball. The illo seems to be an airbrushed photo of Model Super B, obscuring the battery compartment.
Super De Luxe Electric Baseball Model Super B - circa 1949

Here, Super De Luxe Electric Baseball Model Super B (we think it's "Super B," but maybe it's "Super 8"). The Super De Luxe games are among just a handful of Prentice baseball games to carry a non-Prentice patent number -- for this and Model 102 (below), it's Edmund Abrahamson's 1948 patent for the "vibration actuated indicator."

Super De Luxe Electric Baseball Model 102, 1949

Presumably also from about 1949, then, is the version of Super De Luxe Electric Baseball shown at left -- Model 102, an impressively massive specimen at 22.25x14.25" and nearly 4" deep. Based on the advert shown above, our guess is that the 102 here is the "Varsity Model" and the Super B (above) is the "Deluxe Model," the Super De Luxe Deluxe. Lotsa luxe!

Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Model 108-B, 1952
  Eureka!  At left, Jim Prentice Electric Baseball 
  Model 108-B.  This was a new discovery, 
  presented by a member of our Forum in 2015.  
  We'd never before seen an example of it, and 
  had wondered whether the illustration of it in 
  the 1952 advertisement that used to occupy 
  that spot in this article was again merely an 
  artist's concept -- or an old-stock bit of artwork, 
  since the ad clearly shows the gameboard's 
  more dignified graphics and typography typical 
  of the late-1930s to mid-1940s Prentice games, 
  not the more playful, cartoonish fonts used on 
  post-1950 models.   


        We'll mention here that, by the early 1950s, 
  The Electric Game Company was turning out 
  not just baseball, football, and basketball games, 
  but also Electric Hockey, Electric Bowling, 
  Electric TV Quiz, Electric Put-N-Take, Electric 
  Fire Fighters, Electric Jack Straws, Electric 
  Bunny Run, and more -- most all of them 
  Prentice designs. 

Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Senior Model 66-B box - circa 1950
The box lid for Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Senior Model 66-B has a particularly antique feel -- and its graphics a decidedly amateurish look, which very much appears to be the work of the same hand that produced the cover art for The Electric Game Company's 1945 non-electric Whiz Baseball.
Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Senior Model 66-B - circa 1950
The gameboard of Senior Model 66-B, however, looks much more in the style of later, 1950s, Prentice games, so we'd put this as circa 1950.

Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Model 42-B box - circa 1950
The graphics of the box lid for Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Model 42-B mix the jaunty font seen on Model 63-B with the blocky font from the box for Senior Model 66-B, and indeed, factory stamps on the underside of the gameboard confirm it as a late-1953, early-1954 manufacture. The pitcher will reappear on the "Motor Action" models later in the '50s.
Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Model 42-B - circa 1950
The 42-B is an unusual "low-tech" version, featuring a cardboard gameboard rather than the usual masonite type of material, not to mention a box bottom, too.

Jim Prentice Electric Baseball - 1950s
The same artist responsible for the 42-B box seems to show their hand on this redesign, used for the 73-B models (right and below). Prentice redesigned the game yet again, too, of course, introducing a series of slightly larger (18.5x14"), horizontally-oriented gameboards.
Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Model 73-B - 1950s
Above, Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Model 73-B, one of four similar editions produced in and around 1953. This example provides no "storage" holes for the baserunner pegs.

Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Model 73-B - 1950s
Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Model 73-B - variation with peg storage

Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Model 73BN - 1950s
Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Model 73BN

Jim Prentice Electric Baseball No. 70 Deluxe - 1950s
Although -- apologies -- the evidence is not much better than that of a blurry photo of a passing UFO, this variation of Model 73BN appears to use only an electrical cord rather than batteries. The accompanying shipping box labels it "No. 70 Deluxe."

Jim Prentice Electric Baseball 5 Star ***** Model 509 - 1950s
Jim Prentice Electric Baseball 5 Star ***** Model 509 -- clearly related to the 73-B and 73BN models, but with even more bells and whistles and blinkenlights, and using a 500-series code associated with the later "Motor Action" games.

Jim Prentice Electric Baseball - box, Models 73B, 73BN, 509 - 1950s
This heavier corrugated white box, probably more often used for shipping mail-order games, is associated with models 73-B, 73BN, and 509 (above).

Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Model 79B box - 1950s
Another sturdy corrugated box contained the scarce Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Model 79-B. The box is at least a trifle wider than the previous example, and we've been informed it is indeed yellow, not white and merely lit to appear yellow.
Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Model 79B - 1950s
Although a more recent number, Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Model 79-B is a tough find today.

Jim Prentice Electric Baseball
The corrugated white box is stretched even wider to accommodate the scarce version of Jim Prentice Electric Baseball shown at right. We haven't been hands-on with this variation, so we're uncertain of the model number, three characters beginning with "10." A 1955 ad, however, establishes a date for it.
Jim Prentice Electric Baseball

Electric Motor Baseball Model M100
The pitcher from Model 42-B makes a comeback on the corrugated shipping box for Electric Motor Baseball Model M-100, probably mid-to-late 1950s.
Electric Motor Baseball Model M100
Electric Motor Baseball Model M-100

Jim Prentice Electric Motor Action Baseball Model 514
The 42-B pitcher kicks for one last delivery, here on the store-model box for Jim Prentice Electric Motor Action Baseball Model 514, probably late 1950s, possibly circa 1960. The box aprons also call this "Dual Control Model." The 514 is the only other version of Electric Baseball we've seen, besides the 1940s Dual Control models and the 1949 Super Deluxe, bearing a non-Prentice patent.
Jim Prentice Electric Motor Action Baseball Model 514
Jim Prentice Electric Motor Action Baseball Model 514, above. The design, much altered by Prentice, was granted in 1954 to Harry Hutchins.

Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Model 504
The 17x12" gameboard of Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Model 504 is very similar to that of models 514 and 505 and the earlier M-100, but the box graphics have a new look with more of an early '60s feel. There's a resemblance to the artwork in Ed-U-Cards' 1957 Baseball Card Game, but the identity of the artist or artists is unknown.
Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Model 504
Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Model 504 - circa 1960

Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Model 505
The more modern graphics of the store box for Model 504 are seen again here on the corrugated shipping box for Model 505 at right, very likely also a late-'50s, early '60s item. It's almost certainly this 500 series that, unfortunately, marked the final innings for Electric Baseball.
Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Model 505
Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Model 505


  But hold everything!  
  The game's not over yet!  
  The remarkable thing at right -- a 
  previously unknown "action" game   
  featuring a spring-loaded bat on a 
  vacuum-formed plastic gameboard   
  -- showed up in the spring of 2014.  
  The plastic construction, as well 
  as a radical departure in both 
  method of play and in box and 
  board graphics, strongly suggests 
  this is no older than a 1960s 
  version.  
Electric Baseball, circa 1960s

 
 At a few points in this article, we've made reference to advertisements that aren't actually displayed on this page.  
 That's due in large part to having discovered those ads long after this article was written, combined with the sad fact  
 that we're too darned lazy to rearrange the whole page layout here to accommodate presenting those ads, beyond 
 just adding a few words to suggest the ads exist.  But, also, those ads are worth seeing close to full size, and 
 there may be still more ads yet to be found and then to be added as well, so we're inserting this little list of links, 
 each of which opens a new page containing a full-sized vintage advertisement for some version of Electric Baseball:  

 Electric Baseball and Electric Football, 1937
 Big League Electric Baseball and others, 1941
 Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Model E120, 1947
 Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Model 48 B (early variation), 1947
 Wonder Baseball Game, Johnson-Smith catalogue, 1948
 Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Model 48 B (early variation), 1949
 Super De Luxe Electric Baseball, 1949 
 Super De Luxe Electric Baseball, 1949 
 Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Model 48-B, ad from Lady Luck August 1950
 Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Model 73-B ("77B" on order form), 1951 
 Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Model 108-B, 1952  
 Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Model 73-B, 1953 
 Jim Prentice Electric Baseball, Model 10... ?, 1955 


Jim's LectraMatic Baseball - LectraMatic Games, 1960s
Some newspaper accounts tell that Prentice had sold the company and retired from the game and toy business before 1960, but there's clear evidence that Prentice, the Electric Game Company, and its nationwide sales force were all going strong at the 1961 New York Toy Fair, even introducing their new Electric Speedway auto-race game while still hawking the rest of their line of games. Prentice did sell the business at some point in the 1960s -- but it's uncertain whether Jim's LectraMatic Baseball by "Jim's LectraMatic Games," roughly similar to the late 1940s' "Super De Luxe" models, and sporting typical Prentice pennant motifs as well as carrying some Jim's name, was the product of an entirely different outfit or a final swing by Prentice with his own company renamed.
Jim's LectraMatic Baseball - LectraMatic Games, 1960s
Jim's LectraMatic Baseball Model 2000 -- Jim's LectraMatic Games, 1960s

Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Model BB-150
Jim Prentice Electric Baseball Model BB-150
 
But wait! There are still a couple more items of interest for Electric Game Company completists.
Prentice's electrical baseball games were not limited to the boardgame format. At left is Model BB-150, a baseball-themed pinball game measuring about 25x15x11", and above, the backglass with an alternate yellow frame. The only clue we have as to its date of production is the presence of the Electric Game Company logo that first appeared around 1949 and remained through the 1950s.

Whiz Baseball
And there was also this non-electric entry, from 1945 -- Whiz Baseball. The artwork and yellow box are rather reminiscent of that for Senior Model 66-B. We await the umpire's signal, but we suspect that awkward-looking delivery may constitute a balk. The red bits seen on the gameboard at right are not lightbulbs, but wooden pegs. A small top placed on the inclined lower sixth of the board was spun with the fingers, and the pegs it knocked over and the holes in which it landed determined the result of each play -- similar to Milton Bradley's much smaller 1957 version of Swat Baseball.
Whiz Baseball
Whiz Baseball Model W200, 1945 -- approximately 19.5x11.5"

Electric Game Company logo, circa 1950

  Many years of research -- well, okay, a few minutes of research here and there   
  over the course of many years -- have not solved many a mystery surrounding 
  Jim Prentice and Electric Baseball.  Our chronology of the games is still only 
  a working theory.  And our list of Electric Baseball models is still probably 
  incomplete -- we have a report of a Model 88-B, a game for which we have yet 
  to see any other evidence, and illustrated advertisements hint at the existence 
  of other uncatalogued models.  We can state that game parts and adverts 
  show at least ten different Holyoke addresses for the Electric Game Company 
  -- eight different just from 1947 to 1953. 


  And what of the man himself?  It's tough to suss Prentice when so little has actually 
  been written about him, leaving us to scour for factoids and to read between the lines, 
  a risky prospect when all the available articles were written very late in Prentice's 
  long life, several of those pieces read like amateur items in your local Pennysaver, 
  and most of them clearly struggle badly to find a happy spin to put on Prentice's life 
  and career.  We'd like to picture Prentice as the stereotype of the kindly inventor -- 
  modest, cerebral, quietly good-humored.  A bit of that comes through in one solid 
  1996 profile by Bill Stephens of the Union-News -- "I was born an inventor," Prentice 
  told him, "but that doesn't mean you're real good, you know."  
        On the other hand, Prentice admits to being a harsh boss, claiming to have fired 
  14 of every 15 employees he hired.  And he sounds petty in his snide ridicule of the 
  much more successful Tudor Tru-Action Electric Football.  Then again, while almost 
  every one of the articles notes how sharp Prentice is at his age, he forgets that he 
  produced about half a dozen electric football games of his own, and when confronted 
  with an edition of Electric Baseball, Prentice says "To be honest, I can't even tell you 
  exactly how this works now." 
        He may have had an excuse for forgetfulness, but if indeed Prentice was bitter, 
  there seems little reason for it.  His 1940 marriage lasted 55 years and produced 
  some number of daughters.  An active Rotarian, he also served as president of the 
  Holyoke Boys' Club.  He served as president of the Toy Manufacturers Association.  
  He appears to have engaged in a long-running scientific correspondence with the 
  engineering department at UC Berkeley.  In 1993, in recognition of his lifelong 
  contributions to gaming, he was presented with the Abbot Award by the American 
  Game Collectors Association, now the AGPC.   
        One personal disappointment for Prentice may have been that his creation of 
  the "Batting Worth Average," a clutch-hitter rating that long prefigured the works of 
  Bill James, did not grab the interest of fans or MLB.  He did remain active almost 
  to the end, however.  He started the Durmatic Company -- renamed PrenCo in 1980 
  -- successfully manufacturing disposable bibs for use with toddlers and geriatric 
  patients, and ran that into the late 1990s.  As the 20th century neared its close, 
  he ventured into successful production of a redesigned golf tee and toyed with 
  other inventions like an electrical flyswatter.  Alas, for Prentice, the batteries 
  finally ran out, so to speak, in January 2005. 
 Jim Prentice, 1996
Prentice is seen above in a photo from around 1995. Once again, we welcome any additions and corrections to the material in this photo-essay. If you have solid information regarding Electric Baseball or Prentice, please help bring us up to speed at the Baseball Games Forum!


  Here's a list, in vaguely chronological order, of all Jim Prentice / 
  Electric Game Company baseball games, and related games made by 
  other companies, that we've been able to verify through January 2017: 

  Electric Base Ball : D02, 1930s 
  Electric Base Ball : DD24, 1930s 
  Big League Electric Baseball : B-4, 1938-41 
  Wonder Baseball Game, 1938-48 
  Jim Prentice Electric Baseball, circa 1940 
  Wonder Baseball Game, 1940s  (non-electric) 
  Jim Prentice Electric Baseball ~ Dual Control Model, 1940s  (three knobs)  
  Jim Prentice Electric Baseball ~ Dual Control Model, 1940s  (two knobs) 
  Whiz Baseball : Model W200, 1945 
  Jim Prentice Electric Baseball : Model E120, 1947 
  Jim Prentice Electric Baseball : Model 48 B, 1947 
  Jim Prentice Electric Baseball : Model 68-B, 1940s 
  Super De Luxe Electric Baseball : Model Super B, 1949 
  Super De Luxe Electric Baseball : Model 102, 1949  
  Jim Prentice Electric Baseball : Model 48-B, 1950 
  Jim Prentice Electric Baseball : Model 63-B, circa 1950 
  Jim Prentice Electric Baseball ~ Senior Model : 66 B, circa 1950 
  Jim Prentice Electric Baseball : Model BB-150, circa 1950s 
  Jim Prentice Electric Baseball : Model 108-B, 1952 
  Jim Prentice Electric Baseball : Model 42-B, 1953-54 
  Jim Prentice Electric Baseball : Model 73 B, 1950s  (peg holes)  
  Jim Prentice Electric Baseball : Model 73 B, 1950s  (no peg holes)  
  Jim Prentice Electric Baseball : Model 73 BN, 1950s 
  Jim Prentice Electric Baseball : No. 70 Deluxe, 1950s 
  Jim Prentice Electric Baseball : 5 Star ***** Model 509, 1950s 
  Jim Prentice Electric Baseball : Model 79-B, 1950s 
  Jim Prentice Electric Baseball : Model 10(?), 1950s 
  Jim Prentice Electric Motor Baseball : Model M-100, 1950s 
  Jim Prentice Electric Motor Action Baseball : Model 514, circa 1960  
  Jim Prentice Electric Baseball : Model 504, circa 1960 
  Jim Prentice Electric Baseball : Model 505, circa 1960 
  Baseball with "Live Action" by Jim Prentice, 1960s 

  Electric Base Ball Game  (Parker Brothers), early 1930s 
  Electro-Vision Baseball  (Tracies Inc), 1947-49 
  Prolectric Baseball  (Mastercraft), 1951 
  Jim's LectraMatic Baseball : Model 2000  (Jim's LectraMatic Games), 1960s   

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Thanks to members of our Baseball Games Forum, and special thanks to fellow collector Mike Rothstein, for their valuable research and input!



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